Since June 2017, Debian 9 Stretch is available in stable branch. Consequently, Debian 8 (Jessie) is tagged now oldtable and Debian 7 (Wheezy) is tagged oldoldstable.

What's new ?

After 26 months of development the Debian project is proud to present its new stable version 9 (code name Stretch), which will be supported for the next 5 years thanks to the combined work of the Debian Security team and of the Debian Long Term Support team.

Debian 9 is dedicated to the project's founder Ian Murdock, who passed away on 28 December 2015.

In Stretch, the default MySQL variant is now MariaDB. The replacement of packages for MySQL 5.5 or 5.6 by the MariaDB 10.1 variant will happen automatically upon upgrade.

Firefox and Thunderbird return to Debian with the release of Stretch, and replace their debranded versions Iceweasel and Icedove, which were present in the archive for more than 10 years.

Thanks to the Reproducible Builds project, over 90% of the source packages included in Debian 9 will build bit-for-bit identical binary packages. This is an important verification feature which protects users from malicious attempts to tamper with compilers and build networks. Future Debian releases will include tools and metadata so that end-users can validate the provenance of packages within the archive.

Administrators and those in security-sensitive environments can be comforted in the knowledge that the X display system no longer requires root privileges to run.

The Stretch release is the first version of Debian to feature the modern branch of GnuPG in the gnupg package. This brings with it elliptic curve cryptography, better defaults, a more modular architecture, and improved smartcard support. We will continue to supply the classic branch of GnuPG as gnupg1 for people who need it, but it is now deprecated.

Debug packages are easier to obtain and use in Debian 9 Stretch. A new dbg-sym repository can be added to the APT source list to provide debug symbols automatically for many packages.

The UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface) support first introduced in Wheezy continues to be greatly improved in Stretch, and also supports installing on 32-bit UEFI firmware with a 64-bit kernel. The Debian live images now include support for UEFI booting as a new feature, too.

Naturaly, some packages are updated :

  • Apache 2.4.25
  • Asterisk 13.14.1
  • Chromium 59.0.3071.86
  • Firefox 45.9 (in the firefox-esr package)
  • GIMP 2.8.18
  • an updated version of the GNOME desktop environment 3.22
  • GNU Compiler Collection 6.3
  • GnuPG 2.1
  • Golang 1.7
  • KDE Frameworks 5.28, KDE Plasma 5.8, and KDE Applications 16.08 and 16.04 for PIM components
  • LibreOffice 5.2
  • Linux 4.9
  • MariaDB 10.1
  • MATE 1.16
  • OpenJDK 8
  • Perl 5.24
  • PHP 7.0
  • PostgreSQL 9.6
  • Python 2.7.13 and 3.5.3
  • Ruby 2.3
  • Samba 4.5
  • systemd 232
  • Thunderbird 45.8
  • Tomcat 8.5
  • Xen Hypervisor
  • the Xfce 4.12 desktop environment
  • more than 51,000 other ready-to-use software packages, built from a bit more of 25,000 source packages.

Source

To complete informations, you can read release notes : https://www.debian.org/releases/stretch/amd64/release-notes/

Upgrade

The first step to upgrade a system (Debian or other), is the most important: Backup all ! After this critical step, you can follow next steps :

  • Control if actual system is up to date
apt update
apt full-upgrade
  • Modify configuration to change Jessie to Stretch

Modifying the /etc/apt/sources.list file to remplace jessie to stretch. You can use the following command to do the changement automaticaly :

sed -i 's|jessie|stretch|' /etc/apt/sources.list

You must verify /etc/apt/sources.list.d/ directory too.

Your file sources.list must be like this :

deb http://deb.debian.org/debian stretch main
deb http://deb.debian.org/debian stretch-updates main
deb http://security.debian.org/ stretch/updates main
  • Launch upgrade

The final step is the upgrade itself :

apt update
apt full-upgrade

This step take time !

  • Verification

After a reboot, you can control with commands :

cat /etc/debian_version
lsb_release -a
uname -a

The result must be like this :

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